Dataset

Assessing the impact of counterfactual thinking messages for communicating the importance of breast cancer re-screening

University of Wollongong
Sandra Jones (Principal investigator)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://hdl.handle.net/102.100.100/6818&rft.title=Assessing the impact of counterfactual thinking messages for communicating the importance of breast cancer re-screening&rft.identifier=http://hdl.handle.net/102.100.100/6818&rft.publisher=University of Wollongong&rft.description=Component one: Literature review to understand issues pertinent to women presenting for breast re-screening. The review includes an examination of (1) studies measuring the prevalence of mammography rescreening; (2) studies exploring factors contributing to returning for repeat screening; and (3) studies examining what the factors and intervention strategies that facilitate or encourage women to return for repeat mammograms. Key words and parameters used: Key words: mammog$ and rescreen$, re-screen$, repeat screen$ re-attend$ reattend$. Limited to 1990-2005. Number of articles identified: 64 Component two: Formative research using focus groups to identify attitudes and beliefs regarding mammography. Results used to develop appropriate counterfactual messages for the project's intervention. Participant surveys, women 50-69 years of age. Component three: A community intervention consisting of two phases. Community Study 1 designed to test whether counterfactual messages resonated with the target audience (how this impacted on self-efficacy). Community study 2 designed to compare the self-efficacy and intentions of women to present for re-screening when presented with counterfactual messages. Survey data and follow up telephone interview. Component four: Collaboration with BreastScreen NSW, an intervention to ascertain the impact of counterfactual messages on behaviour - actual presentations for mammography screening. BreastScreen NSW participant survey.&rft.creator=Sandra Jones&rft.date=1970&rft.coverage=illawarra&rft_subject=breast&rft_subject=cancer&rft_subject=re-screening&rft_subject=mammography&rft_subject=counterfactual messages&rft_subject=PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES&rft_subject=MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=PSYCHOLOGY&rft_subject=PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Full description

Component one: Literature review to understand issues pertinent to women presenting for breast re-screening. The review includes an examination of (1) studies measuring the prevalence of mammography rescreening; (2) studies exploring factors contributing to returning for repeat screening; and (3) studies examining what the factors and intervention strategies that facilitate or encourage women to return for repeat mammograms. Key words and parameters used: Key words: mammog$ and rescreen$, re-screen$, repeat screen$ re-attend$ reattend$. Limited to 1990-2005. Number of articles identified: 64 Component two: Formative research using focus groups to identify attitudes and beliefs regarding mammography. Results used to develop appropriate counterfactual messages for the project's intervention. Participant surveys, women 50-69 years of age. Component three: A community intervention consisting of two phases. Community Study 1 designed to test whether counterfactual messages resonated with the target audience (how this impacted on self-efficacy). Community study 2 designed to compare the self-efficacy and intentions of women to present for re-screening when presented with counterfactual messages. Survey data and follow up telephone interview. Component four: Collaboration with BreastScreen NSW, an intervention to ascertain the impact of counterfactual messages on behaviour - actual presentations for mammography screening. BreastScreen NSW participant survey.

Submitted: 27 04 2011

Data time period: 1990-01-01 - 2007-12-31

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150.4892292,-34.435389

150.4892292,-34.435389

text: illawarra

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