Dataset
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://data.unisa.edu.au/Collection.aspx?CollectionID=278885 UniSA Research Data Access Portal&rft.title=Asymmetric Capillary Particle collection of datasets&rft.identifier=http://research.unisa.edu.au/collection/278885&rft.publisher=University of South Australia&rft.description=This collection includes datasets concerned with a theoretical investigation of particle transport in longitudinally asymmetric but axially symmetric capillaries, allowing for the influence of both diffusion and convection. In this study attention is focused on characterizing the influence of tube geometry and applied hydraulic pressure on the magnitude, direction and rate of transport of particles in axi-symmetric, saw-tooth shaped tubes. Three initial value problems are considered. The first involves the evolution of a fixed number of particles initially confined to a central wave-section. The second involves the evolution of the same initial state but including an ongoing production of particles in the central wave-section. The third involves the evolution of particles in a fully laden tube. Based on a physical model of convective-diffusive transport, assuming an underlying oscillatory fluid velocity field that is unaffected by the presence of the particles, we find that transport rates and even net transport directions depend critically on the design specifics, such as tube geometry, flow rate, initial particle configuration and whether or not particles are continuously introduced. The second transient scenario is qualitatively independent of the details of how particles are generated. In the third scenario there is no net transport. This fundamental study could engender greater understanding of practical systems, such as particle transport in periodic micro- and nano-ratchets.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2017&rft_rights=Licensing conditions for the datasets related to this collection are contained within each dataset.&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge in the Mathematical Sciences&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge in Engineering&rft_subject=010200&rft_subject=Theoretical and Applied Mechanics&rft_subject=Mathematical Sciences&rft_subject=Applied Mathematics&rft_subject=Fluid Physics&rft_subject=Physical Sciences&rft_subject=Classical Physics&rft_subject=Convective-Diffusive Transport&rft_subject=Stokes Flow&rft_subject=Axisymmetric Tubes&rft_subject=Recirculation Flow&rft_subject=Boundary Element Method&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Providers

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Licensing conditions for the datasets related to this collection are contained within each dataset.

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Contact Information

Stan.Miklavcic@unisa.edu.au

Brief description

This collection includes datasets concerned with a theoretical investigation of particle transport in longitudinally asymmetric but axially symmetric capillaries, allowing for the influence of both diffusion and convection. In this study attention is focused on characterizing the influence of tube geometry and applied hydraulic pressure on the magnitude, direction and rate of transport of particles in axi-symmetric, saw-tooth shaped tubes. Three initial value problems are considered. The first involves the evolution of a fixed number of particles initially confined to a central wave-section. The second involves the evolution of the same initial state but including an ongoing production of particles in the central wave-section. The third involves the evolution of particles in a fully laden tube. Based on a physical model of convective-diffusive transport, assuming an underlying oscillatory fluid velocity field that is unaffected by the presence of the particles, we find that transport rates and even net transport directions depend critically on the design specifics, such as tube geometry, flow rate, initial particle configuration and whether or not particles are continuously introduced. The second transient scenario is qualitatively independent of the details of how particles are generated. In the third scenario there is no net transport. This fundamental study could engender greater understanding of practical systems, such as particle transport in periodic micro- and nano-ratchets.
Reuse Information

Existing data was sourced from:
local : COLL_EXISTING_DATA
No

The following software (and version) was used to generate or capture the data:
local : COLL_SW_DATA_CAPTURE
In-house created Fortran code was used to generate data. Microsoft Excel 2013 and Matlab R2013b software packages were used to produce final figures.

The following instruments/equipment were used to generate or capture the data:
local : COLL_INST_DATA_CAPTURE
Results were produced using a high performance computer using an in-house computational code.

The following software (and version) was used to analyse the data:
local : COLL_SW_DATA_ANALYSIS
Data was generated using in-house developed computational code

The following discipline-specific metadata standards describe the data:
local : COLL_METADATA_STANDARDS
No

Data time period: 2016 to 12 2016

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Identifiers
  • Local : http://research.unisa.edu.au/collection/278885