Dataset

Australian Animal Folklore Collection

Federation University Australia
University of Ballarat (Output of)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/36247&rft.title=Australian Animal Folklore Collection&rft.identifier= http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/36247&rft.publisher=Federation University Australia&rft.description=The Australian Animal Folklore Collection is held in the Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre (Federation University Australia E.J. Barker Library, Mt. Helen), and can be accessed by researchers in the Centre’s supervised reading room. The collection includes objects such as plaster paw prints, images, documents, reports, and newspaper articles relating to big cat scares that have become legendary over a number of generations. Themes within the collection relate to cryptozoology;  big cats and dogs in the Australian bush, such as pumas, panthers, mountain lions, thylacines (Tasmanian Tigers); and legends such as the Tantanoola Tiger, the Black Dog of Bungay, the Grampians Puma,  and the Gippsland Panther.   The collection was used by Dr David Waldron during his research into Australian big cat mythology and the book ‘Snarls from the Tea-tree: Big Cat Folklore’ co-authored by David Waldron and Simon Townsend. The Australian Animal Folklore collection has been supplemented with donations by other interested researchers such as David Pepper-Edwards.  Aspects of the collection can be viewed online via   https://victoriancollections.net.au/   with the link or alternatively using the terms http://victoriancollections.net.au/?q=Australian+Animal+Folklore++Collection           X &rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2013&rft.relation=9781921875830&rft.coverage=143.879583,-37.631528&rft_subject=Australian History (Excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History)&rft_subject=History and Archaeology&rft_subject=Historical Studies&rft_subject=Folklore&rft_subject=Big Cats&rft_subject=Puma&rft_subject=Cryptozoology&rft_subject=Animals Mythology&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Access:

Other view details

Access available via Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre opening hours

Contact Information

Street Address:
<p> Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre,</p><p> E.J. Barker Library,</p><p> Federation University Australia</p><p>Mt Helen, Victoria, 3550</p>
Ph: 03 53279168

c.gervasoni@federation.edu.au

Full description

The Australian Animal Folklore Collection is held in the Geoffrey Blainey Research Centre (Federation University Australia E.J. Barker Library, Mt. Helen), and can be accessed by researchers in the Centre’s supervised reading room. The collection includes objects such as plaster paw prints, images, documents, reports, and newspaper articles relating to big cat scares that have become legendary over a number of generations. Themes within the collection relate to cryptozoology;  big cats and dogs in the Australian bush, such as pumas, panthers, mountain lions, thylacines (Tasmanian Tigers); and legends such as the Tantanoola Tiger, the Black Dog of Bungay, the Grampians Puma,  and the Gippsland Panther.

 

The collection was used by Dr David Waldron during his research into Australian big cat mythology and the book ‘Snarls from the Tea-tree: Big Cat Folklore’ co-authored by David Waldron and Simon Townsend. The Australian Animal Folklore collection has been supplemented with donations by other interested researchers such as David Pepper-Edwards.

 Aspects of the collection can be viewed online via  

https://victoriancollections.net.au/
 

with the link or alternatively using the terms http://victoriancollections.net.au/?q=Australian+Animal+Folklore++Collection

 

 

 

 

 

X

Data time period: 2011 to 2012

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143.879583,-37.631528

143.879583,-37.631528

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