Dataset

Berndt Museum Rock Art: The Western Desert Collections

The University of Western Australia
Professor Alistair Paterson (Enriched by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://www.berndt.uwa.edu.au/generic.lasso?token_value=western&amp;menu=5&rft.title=Berndt Museum Rock Art: The Western Desert Collections&rft.identifier=http://www.berndt.uwa.edu.au/generic.lasso?token_value=western&amp;menu=5&rft.publisher=The University of Western Australia&rft.description=<p>The Western Desert cultural bloc occupies an area of approximately 670,000 sq. km. and extends across much of Western Australia as well as parts of South Australia and the Northern Territory. One of the last areas to be explored by European-Australians, it remains the homeland of about 7,500 Aboriginal people, many of whom live on former government and mission stations and local outstations, where they are largely responsible for the management of their own affairs. The Museum has more than 1,400 objects from the Western Desert region, mostly from Western Australia. They include weapons, tools, toys and objects used in love magic. The Museum has an extensive photographic collection. It contains photographs, negatives and colour slides, and consists of many small collections donated to the Museum.</p>&rft.creator=The Centre for Rock-Art Studies&rft.date=2014&rft.coverage=117.949219,-16.636192 117.949219,-32.249974 135.175781,-32.249974 135.175781,-16.636192 117.949219,-16.636192&rft_subject=Social and Cultural Anthropology&rft_subject=Studies in Human Society&rft_subject=Anthropology&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Access:

Other view details

Museum policy recognises the need to control image recording within the public galleries in order to safeguard claims to control over cultural property made by members of Australian Aboriginal communities, among others. Notwithstanding this, the policy observes that: • visting members of the public may take, for their own fair dealing for the purpose of research or study, criticism or review (as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968), photographs of a general view of an exhibition gallery space as a whole, while they may not focus on specific individual artistic works that may be subject to copyright and claims of cultural property by Aboriginal communities; • recordings (whether photographic, digital or video) made for any other purpose require express permission in writing from the Director, who will give approval only if the purpose and or context is directly relevant to the purpose, activities and projects of the Museum itself. The Berndt Museum respects the inherent intellectual and moral rights of all artistic creators, and makes every effort to contact the relevant copyright holders and and their communities before displaying or making artistic works available for third party reproduction. All requests for photographic images, whether of objects held by the Museum or historical images, must be made on the prescribed form, which is available for download.


The Berndt Museum will be closed to all external requests for access to the Collection (Archives, Objects, Photos and Audio-Visual) between 1 July 2014 and 6 January 2015.  Museum staff are instituting protocols to enhance access to the Collection as part of ongoing preparations toward the opening of a new Aboriginal Cultures Museum.  We sincerely apologise to community groups, researchers and the general public. We will attend to access requests as soon as we can after the six month closure.

The Berndt Museum, with permission from the appropriate communities, holds some secret-sacred objects. Strict conditions apply to the custody of and access to these objects. Secret-sacred objects are not displayed in the public gallery of the Museum. The objects displayed there are not secret for their region of origin. The Museum will remove any object from display if a qualified Aboriginal elder asks.


Contact Information

Postal Address:
Berndt Museum of Anthropology, M255A
The University of Western Australia
35 Stirling Highway
Crawley, Western Australia, 6009
Ph: (+61 8) 6488 2854
Fax: (+61 8) 6488 1165

berndt.museum@uwa.edu.au

Brief description

The Western Desert cultural bloc occupies an area of approximately 670,000 sq. km. and extends across much of Western Australia as well as parts of South Australia and the Northern Territory. One of the last areas to be explored by European-Australians, it remains the homeland of about 7,500 Aboriginal people, many of whom live on former government and mission stations and local outstations, where they are largely responsible for the management of their own affairs. The Museum has more than 1,400 objects from the Western Desert region, mostly from Western Australia. They include weapons, tools, toys and objects used in love magic. The Museum has an extensive photographic collection. It contains photographs, negatives and colour slides, and consists of many small collections donated to the Museum.

117.949219,-16.636192 117.949219,-32.249974 135.175781,-32.249974 135.175781,-16.636192 117.949219,-16.636192

126.5625,-24.443083

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