Dataset

Data on zero tillages affect on greenhouse gas emissions

University of Southern Queensland
Dr. Geoff Cockfield (Aggregated by) Dr. Tek Maraseni (Aggregated by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft.title=Data on zero tillages affect on greenhouse gas emissions&rft.identifier=USQ-DataColl-0005&rft.publisher=University of Southern Queensland&rft.description= The Australian Government has recommended that farmers move from cultivation-based dryland farming to reduced or zero tillage systems. The private benefits could include improvements in yields and a decrease in costs while the public benefits could include a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to a diminution in the use of heavy machinery. The aim of this study is to estimate and compare total on-farm GHG emissions from conventional and zero tillage systems based on selected grain crop rotations in the Darling Downs region of Queensland, Australia. The value chain was identified, including all inputs, and emissions. In addition, studies of soil carbon sequestration and nitrous oxide emissions under the different cropping systems were reviewed. The value chain analysis revealed that the net effect on GHG emissions by switching to zero tillage is positive but relatively small. In addition though, the review of the sequestration studies suggests that there might be soil-based emissions that result from zero tillage that are being under-estimated. Therefore, zero tillage may not necessarily reduce overall GHG emissions. This could have major implication on current carbon credits offered from volunteer carbon markets for converting conventional tillage to reduced tillage system. &rft.creator=Narayan Maraseni, Tek, Dr &rft.creator=Cockfield, Geoff, Dr &rft.date=2013&rft.coverage=150.922851,-27.201755 149.823583,-27.201755 149.823583,-28.413942 150.922851,-28.413942 150.922851,-27.201755&rft_subject=70106&rft_subject=Environmental Management&rft_subject=Environmental Science and Management&rft_subject=Environmental Sciences&rft_subject=Farming Systems Research&rft_subject=Agriculture, Land and Farm Management&rft_subject=Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences&rft_place=Toowoomba&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Provider

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Contact Dr Tek Maraseni
by email Maraseni@usq.edu.au

Contact Information

Maraseni@usq.edu.au

University of Southern Queensland Toowoomba Qld 4350 Australia

Full description

The Australian Government has recommended that farmers move from cultivation-based dryland farming to reduced or zero tillage systems. The private benefits could include improvements in yields and a decrease in costs while the public benefits could include a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to a diminution in the use of heavy machinery. The aim of this study is to estimate and compare total on-farm GHG emissions from conventional and zero tillage systems based on selected grain crop rotations in the Darling Downs region of Queensland, Australia. The value chain was identified, including all inputs, and emissions. In addition, studies of soil carbon sequestration and nitrous oxide emissions under the different cropping systems were reviewed. The value chain analysis revealed that the net effect on GHG emissions by switching to zero tillage is positive but relatively small. In addition though, the review of the sequestration studies suggests that there might be soil-based emissions that result from zero tillage that are being under-estimated. Therefore, zero tillage may not necessarily reduce overall GHG emissions. This could have major implication on current carbon credits offered from volunteer carbon markets for converting conventional tillage to reduced tillage system.

Notes

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Greenhouse gas emissions

        XLSX (1)

    MS Office Excel 2007

 

Available:

151.937829,-27.590386 151.907686,-27.590386 151.907686,-27.620951 151.937829,-27.620951 151.937829,-27.590386

151.9227575,-27.6056685

150.922851,-27.201755 149.823583,-27.201755 149.823583,-28.413942 150.922851,-28.413942 150.922851,-27.201755

150.373217,-27.8078485

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Identifiers
  • Local : USQ-DataColl-0005