Dataset

Dataset examining host feeding parameters of Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands

James Cook University
Tanya Louise Russell (Aggregated by) Thomas Burkot (Aggregated by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4225/28/56BD6DF7C9CB8&rft.title=Dataset examining host feeding parameters of Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands&rft.identifier=10.4225/28/56BD6DF7C9CB8&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=Background: The proportion of blood meals that mosquitoes take from a host species is a function of the interplay of extrinsic (abundance and location of potential hosts) and intrinsic (innate preference) factors. A mark-release-recapture experiment addressed whether host preference in a population of Anopheles farauti was uniform or if there were anthropophilic and zoophilic subpopulations. The corresponding fitness associated with selecting different hosts for blood meals was compared by measuring fecundity.Methods: The attractiveness of humans for blood meals by An. farauti in the Solomon Islands was compared to pigs using tent traps. Host fidelity was assessed by mark-release-recapture experiments in which different colour dusts were linked to the host to which the mosquito was first attracted. Outdoor resting An. farauti were captured on barrier screens and the human blood index (HBI) as well as the feeding index were calculated. The fecundity of individual An. farauti after feeding on either humans or pigs was assessed from blood-fed mosquitoes held in individual oviposition chambers.Results: Anopheles farauti were more attracted to humans than pigs at a ratio of 1.31:1.00. The mark-release-recapture experiment found evidence for An. farauti being a single population regarding host preference. The HBI of outdoor resting An. farauti was 0.93 and the feeding index was 1.29. Anopheles farauti that fed on a human host laid more eggs but had a longer oviposition time compared to An. farauti that had blood fed on a pig.Conclusions: One of the strongest drivers for host species preference was the relative abundance of the different host species. Here, An. farauti have a slight preference for humans over pigs as blood meal sources. However, the limited availability of alternative hosts relative to humans in the Solomon Islands ensures a very high proportion of blood meals are obtained from humans, and thus, the transmission potential of malaria by An. farauti is high.&rft.creator=Thomas Burkot&rft.creator=Tanya Louise Russell&rft.date=2016&rft.relation=http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-016-1168-y&rft.coverage=Nggela Sule Island, Solomon Islands&rft.coverage=Haleta, Solomon Islands&rft.coverage=160.1116548994,-9.0995969374129 160.11227465139,-9.099392628334 160.1128001309,-9.0990092148079 160.11317990035,-9.0984842275231 160.11337678526,-9.0978690553992 160.11337151317,-9.0972239154698 160.11316460013,-9.0966119585355 160.11277630024,-9.0960930875169 160.112244623,-9.0957180936245 160.11162161269,-9.095523684366 160.11096825388,-9.0955288901738 160.1103485019,-9.0957332014588 160.10982302239,-9.0961166184955 160.10944325293,-9.0966416092541 160.10924636802,-9.0972567834883 160.10925164012,-9.0979019233585 160.10945855316,-9.0985138780865 160.10984685304,-9.0990327455947 160.11037853028,-9.0994077360132 160.1110015406,-9.0996021431614 160.1116548994,-9.0995969374129&rft_rights=CC BY: Attribution 3.0 AU http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au&rft_subject=Host Fidelity&rft_subject=Mark-Release-Recapture&rft_subject=Human Blood Index (Hbi)&rft_subject=Barrier Screens&rft_subject=Outdoor Resting&rft_subject=Fecundity&rft_subject=Anopheles Farauti&rft_subject=Solomon Islands&rft_subject=Population Ecology&rft_subject=Biological Sciences&rft_subject=Ecology&rft_subject=Public Health and Health Services Not Elsewhere Classified&rft_subject=Medical and Health Sciences&rft_subject=Public Health and Health Services&rft_subject=Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales&rft_subject=Environment&rft_subject=Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species&rft_subject=Public Health (Excl. Specific Population Health) Not Elsewhere Classified&rft_subject=Health&rft_subject=Public Health (Excl. Specific Population Health)&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Provider

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Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.

Full description

Background: The proportion of blood meals that mosquitoes take from a host species is a function of the interplay of extrinsic (abundance and location of potential hosts) and intrinsic (innate preference) factors. A mark-release-recapture experiment addressed whether host preference in a population of Anopheles farauti was uniform or if there were anthropophilic and zoophilic subpopulations. The corresponding fitness associated with selecting different hosts for blood meals was compared by measuring fecundity.

Methods: The attractiveness of humans for blood meals by An. farauti in the Solomon Islands was compared to pigs using tent traps. Host fidelity was assessed by mark-release-recapture experiments in which different colour dusts were linked to the host to which the mosquito was first attracted. Outdoor resting An. farauti were captured on barrier screens and the human blood index (HBI) as well as the feeding index were calculated. The fecundity of individual An. farauti after feeding on either humans or pigs was assessed from blood-fed mosquitoes held in individual oviposition chambers.

Results: Anopheles farauti were more attracted to humans than pigs at a ratio of 1.31:1.00. The mark-release-recapture experiment found evidence for An. farauti being a single population regarding host preference. The HBI of outdoor resting An. farauti was 0.93 and the feeding index was 1.29. Anopheles farauti that fed on a human host laid more eggs but had a longer oviposition time compared to An. farauti that had blood fed on a pig.

Conclusions: One of the strongest drivers for host species preference was the relative abundance of the different host species. Here, An. farauti have a slight preference for humans over pigs as blood meal sources. However, the limited availability of alternative hosts relative to humans in the Solomon Islands ensures a very high proportion of blood meals are obtained from humans, and thus, the transmission potential of malaria by An. farauti is high.

Notes

This dataset consists of a description of data archiving and data dictionaries in PDF format and a spreadsheet in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document (.ods) formats

Created: 07 02 2016

Data time period: 22 11 2011 to 20 02 2014

160.1116548994,-9.0995969374129 160.11227465139,-9.099392628334 160.1128001309,-9.0990092148079 160.11317990035,-9.0984842275231 160.11337678526,-9.0978690553992 160.11337151317,-9.0972239154698 160.11316460013,-9.0966119585355 160.11277630024,-9.0960930875169 160.112244623,-9.0957180936245 160.11162161269,-9.095523684366 160.11096825388,-9.0955288901738 160.1103485019,-9.0957332014588 160.10982302239,-9.0961166184955 160.10944325293,-9.0966416092541 160.10924636802,-9.0972567834883 160.10925164012,-9.0979019233585 160.10945855316,-9.0985138780865 160.10984685304,-9.0990327455947 160.11037853028,-9.0994077360132 160.1110015406,-9.0996021431614 160.1116548994,-9.0995969374129

160.11131157664,-9.0975629137637

text: Nggela Sule Island, Solomon Islands

text: Haleta, Solomon Islands

Identifiers