Dataset

Desert Ecology Plot Network: Mammal Abundance Plot-data, Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, 1990-2018

Also known as: Desert Ecology Research Group Plot Network: Mammal Abundance, 1990-2018
The Australian National University
Aaron Greenville (Associated with) Bobby Tamayo (Associated with) Professor Chris Dickman (Associated with) Professor Glenda Wardle (Associated with)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25911/5c108fd44f2e2&rft.title=Desert Ecology Plot Network: Mammal Abundance Plot-data, Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, 1990-2018&rft.identifier=10.25911/5c108fd44f2e2&rft.publisher=The Australian National University&rft.description=Abstract: This mammal abundance trap data package comprises capture data for a specified duration of trapping nights (usually 3 night session) in the Simpson Desert, Western Queensland between 1990 and 2018. Captured mammal fauna were identified and recaptures during the same session were removed (i.e. individuals were only counted once). Date, site and grid number were recorded for all captures, and captured animals were also marked by a unique ear notch prior to their release to identify recaptures. The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are sampled every April-May. The trapping survey aims to quantitatively track long-term shifts in biodiversity and ecological processes in relation to key drivers, including unpredictable rainfall and droughts, fire, feral predators and grazing. A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Desert Ecology's full program is provided at http://doi.org/10.25911/5c13171d944fe Sampling methods: The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. Thirty-six traps were arrayed in a grid covering 1 ha; each grid comprised 6 lines of 6 traps spaced 20 m apart. The top line of traps extended along the dune crest where consecutive numbering starts, and finished along the sixth line 100 m distant in the dune valley or ‘swale’. Traps on each grid were opened for 3 nights once per year and checked in the mornings and sometimes afternoons. The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey, and so there are only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites represented in this table. Other elements of the plot network’s full program share the sampling structure and core sites/plot/grid configuration of the study design. Study extent: The network program uses a core of 12 sites, sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey - only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites are represented in this table for that year. Note Dasycercus cristicauda should be D. blythi, however the former name is used in these data for consistency with previous data packages. Project funding: Between 2012 and 2018 this project was part of the Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN). This work was supported by the Australian Government’s Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Network (www.tern.org.au) – an Australian research infrastructure facility established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy and Education Infrastructure Fund–Super Science Initiative through the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. &rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2018&rft.coverage=Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, Australia&rft.coverage=northlimit = -23.20549; southlimit = -23.99417; westlimit = 137.86511; eastLimit = 138.6059&rft_rights=Creative Commons Licence (CC BY-Attribution) is assigned to this data. Details of the licence can be found a https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_rights=LTERN Deed: 24 and 25 Date of execution: 2015-05-28 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_subject=Ecological Applications&rft_subject=Environmental Sciences&rft_subject=Ecology&rft_subject=Biological Sciences&rft_subject=Zoology&rft_subject=Mammals&rft_subject=Earth Science&rft_subject=Biological Classification&rft_subject=Animals/vertebrates&rft_subject=Ltern Monitoring Theme:mammals&rft_subject=Keyword:mammals&rft_subject=Desert Ecology Research Group&rft_subject=Mammal Abundance&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

LTERN Deed: 24 and 25
Date of execution: 2015-05-28

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Creative Commons Licence (CC BY-Attribution) is assigned to this data. Details of the licence can be found a https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Access:

Open

Contact Information

Postal Address:
University of Sydney Heydon-Laurence Building A08 Sydney, NSW, 2006 Australia

Street Address:
Ph: +61 2 9351 7113

Street Address:
Ph: +61 2 9351 2318

Street Address:
Ph: +61 2 9351 8577

Street Address:
Ph: +61 2 9351 8577

Street Address:
Ph: +61 425 382 205

Street Address:
Ph: +61 420 526 801

glenda.wardle@sydney.edu.au
chris.dickman@sydney.edu.au
aaron.greenvile@sydney.edu.au
bobby.tamayo@sydney.edu.au

Full description

Abstract: This mammal abundance trap data package comprises capture data for a specified duration of trapping nights (usually 3 night session) in the Simpson Desert, Western Queensland between 1990 and 2018. Captured mammal fauna were identified and recaptures during the same session were removed (i.e. individuals were only counted once). Date, site and grid number were recorded for all captures, and captured animals were also marked by a unique ear notch prior to their release to identify recaptures. The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are sampled every April-May. The trapping survey aims to quantitatively track long-term shifts in biodiversity and ecological processes in relation to key drivers, including unpredictable rainfall and droughts, fire, feral predators and grazing.

A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Desert Ecology's full program is provided at http://doi.org/10.25911/5c13171d944fe

Sampling methods: The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. Thirty-six traps were arrayed in a grid covering 1 ha; each grid comprised 6 lines of 6 traps spaced 20 m apart. The top line of traps extended along the dune crest where consecutive numbering starts, and finished along the sixth line 100 m distant in the dune valley or ‘swale’. Traps on each grid were opened for 3 nights once per year and checked in the mornings and sometimes afternoons. The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey, and so there are only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites represented in this table. Other elements of the plot network’s full program share the sampling structure and core sites/plot/grid configuration of the study design.

Study extent: The network program uses a core of 12 sites, sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey - only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites are represented in this table for that year. Note Dasycercus cristicauda should be D. blythi, however the former name is used in these data for consistency with previous data packages.

Project funding: Between 2012 and 2018 this project was part of the Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN). This work was supported by the Australian Government’s Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Network (www.tern.org.au) – an Australian research infrastructure facility established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy and Education Infrastructure Fund–Super Science Initiative through the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.

Created: 2018-10-22

Data time period: 1990 to 2018

Click to explore relationships graph

138.6059,-23.20549 138.6059,-23.99417 137.86511,-23.99417 137.86511,-23.20549 138.6059,-23.20549

138.235505,-23.59983

text: Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, Australia