Dataset

Desert Ecology Plot Network: Vegetation Plot-data, Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, 1993-2018

Also known as: Desert Ecology Research Group Plot Network: Vegetation, 1993+
The Australian National University
Aaron Greenville (Associated with) Bobby Tamayo (Associated with) Professor Chris Dickman (Associated with) Professor Glenda Wardle (Associated with)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25911/5c355ce264ffe&rft.title=Desert Ecology Plot Network: Vegetation Plot-data, Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, 1993-2018&rft.identifier=10.25911/5c355ce264ffe&rft.publisher=The Australian National University&rft.description=Abstract: This vegetation data package comprises structure and floristic data for selected points across grids described in related data packages collected between 1993 and 2018. Vegetation attributes were recorded in an area occupying 2.5 m radius around six traps on each trapping grid and have been aggregated to grid level data. Percentage cover of all plant species, flowering index and seeding index (from 0-5, where 0 is no flowering or seeding and 5 is maximal flowering/seeding) were recorded and are presented here as plot averages which represent the mean amount of flowering or seeding per species. The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are sampled every April-May. The trapping survey aims to quantitatively track long-term shifts in biodiversity and ecological processes in relation to key drivers, including unpredictable rainfall and droughts, fire, feral predators and grazing. A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Desert Ecology's full program is provided at https://doi.org/10.25911/5c13171d944fe. Sampling method: The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. The project involved sampling vegetation structure and plant species composition on the live-trapping grids (used for mammal and reptile sampling) in the Simpson Desert since 1990. Vegetation attributes (plant species occurrence and cover estimates) are recorded in a 2.5 m radius around six pitfall traps on each vertebrate trapping grid (one trap/line, selected at random - see Figure 6.5). The same traps on each grid are re-surveyed each trip; in general, these surveys are conducted around two traps each on the swale, side and crest of the dune. The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May. Other elements of the plot network’s full program share the sampling structure and core sites/plot/grid configuration of the study design. Study extent: There are often changes to the scientific names due to revisions of their taxonomy. These data have chosen to maintain the use of older taxonomies to ensure consistency with previous data in the time series. Please note the following taxonomic revisions (the former name is the name used in these data): [1] Acacia hookeri -> Acacia ericifolia; [2] Adriana hookeri -> Adriana tomentosa var. hookeri; [3] Helipterum molle -> Leucochrysum molle; [4] Helipterum floribundum -> Rhodanthe floribunda; [5] Helipterum moschatum -> Rhodanthe moschata; [6] Mukia maderaspatana -> Cucumis althaeoides; [7] Myriocephalus stuartii -> Polycalymma stuartii; [8] Othonna gregorii -> Senecio gregorii; [9] Psoralea eriantha -> Cullen patens; [10] Ptilotus atriplicifolius -> Ptilotus sessilifolius; [11] Ptilotus exaltatus -> Ptilotus nobilis subsp. nobilis; [12] Rulingia loxophylla -> Androcalva loxophylla; [13] Salsola kali -> Salsola australis; [14] Trianthema pilosa -> Trianthema pilosum Project funding: Between 2012 and 2018 this project was part of, and funded through the Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN) a facility within the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) and supported by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2019&rft.coverage=Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, Australia&rft.coverage=northlimit = -23.20549; southlimit = -23.99417; westlimit = 137.86511; eastLimit = 138.6059&rft_rights=Creative Commons Licence (CC BY- Attribution) is assigned to this data. Details of the licence can be found at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_rights=LTERN Deed: 24 and 25 Date of execution: 2015-05-28 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_subject=Ecological Applications&rft_subject=Environmental Sciences&rft_subject=Ecology&rft_subject=Biological Sciences&rft_subject=Vegetation&rft_subject=Earth Science&rft_subject=Biosphere&rft_subject=Ltern Monitoring Theme:vegetation Structure&rft_subject=Ltern Monitoring Theme:plant Species Composition&rft_subject=Ltern Monitoring Theme:plant Species Abundance&rft_subject=Desert Ecology Research Group&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

LTERN Deed: 24 and 25
Date of execution: 2015-05-28


http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Creative Commons Licence (CC BY- Attribution) is assigned to this data. Details of the licence can be found at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Access:

Open

Contact Information

Postal Address:
Heydon-Laurence Building A08 University of Sydney Sydney, NSW, 2006 Australia

Street Address:
Ph: +61 2 9351 7113

Street Address:
Ph: +61 2 9351 2318

Street Address:
Ph: +61 2 9351 8577

Street Address:
Ph: +61 425 382 205

Street Address:
Ph: +61 420 526 801

glenda.wardle@sydney.edu.au
chris.dickman@sydney.edu.au
aaron.greenvile@sydney.edu.au
bobby.tamayo@sydney.edu.au

Full description

Abstract: This vegetation data package comprises structure and floristic data for selected points across grids described in related data packages collected between 1993 and 2018. Vegetation attributes were recorded in an area occupying 2.5 m radius around six traps on each trapping grid and have been aggregated to grid level data. Percentage cover of all plant species, flowering index and seeding index (from 0-5, where 0 is no flowering or seeding and 5 is maximal flowering/seeding) were recorded and are presented here as plot averages which represent the mean amount of flowering or seeding per species. The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are sampled every April-May. The trapping survey aims to quantitatively track long-term shifts in biodiversity and ecological processes in relation to key drivers, including unpredictable rainfall and droughts, fire, feral predators and grazing.

A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Desert Ecology's full program is provided at https://doi.org/10.25911/5c13171d944fe.

Sampling method: The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. The project involved sampling vegetation structure and plant species composition on the live-trapping grids (used for mammal and reptile sampling) in the Simpson Desert since 1990. Vegetation attributes (plant species occurrence and cover estimates) are recorded in a 2.5 m radius around six pitfall traps on each vertebrate trapping grid (one trap/line, selected at random - see Figure 6.5). The same traps on each grid are re-surveyed each trip; in general, these surveys are conducted around two traps each on the swale, side and crest of the dune. The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May. Other elements of the plot network’s full program share the sampling structure and core sites/plot/grid configuration of the study design.

Study extent: There are often changes to the scientific names due to revisions of their taxonomy. These data have chosen to maintain the use of older taxonomies to ensure consistency with previous data in the time series.

Please note the following taxonomic revisions (the former name is the name used in these data):
[1] Acacia hookeri -> Acacia ericifolia;
[2] Adriana hookeri -> Adriana tomentosa var. hookeri;
[3] Helipterum molle -> Leucochrysum molle;
[4] Helipterum floribundum -> Rhodanthe floribunda;
[5] Helipterum moschatum -> Rhodanthe moschata;
[6] Mukia maderaspatana -> Cucumis althaeoides;
[7] Myriocephalus stuartii -> Polycalymma stuartii;
[8] Othonna gregorii -> Senecio gregorii;
[9] Psoralea eriantha -> Cullen patens;
[10] Ptilotus atriplicifolius -> Ptilotus sessilifolius;
[11] Ptilotus exaltatus -> Ptilotus nobilis subsp. nobilis;
[12] Rulingia loxophylla -> Androcalva loxophylla;
[13] Salsola kali -> Salsola australis;
[14] Trianthema pilosa -> Trianthema pilosum

Project funding: Between 2012 and 2018 this project was part of, and funded through the Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN) a facility within the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) and supported by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy.

Created: 2018-10-22

Data time period: 1993 to 2018

Click to explore relationships graph

138.6059,-23.20549 138.6059,-23.99417 137.86511,-23.99417 137.86511,-23.20549 138.6059,-23.20549

138.235505,-23.59983

text: Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, Australia