Dataset

Dutch- and Australian English-learning 12-month-olds' detection of indexical and linguistic changes to vowel tokens, measured by trial looking time in a serial preference task following familiarization

Western Sydney University
Karen Mulak (Associated with, Aggregated by) Paola Escudero (Aggregated by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4225/35/58d9c90f68536&rft.title=Dutch- and Australian English-learning 12-month-olds' detection of indexical and linguistic changes to vowel tokens, measured by trial looking time in a serial preference task following familiarization&rft.identifier=10.4225/35/58d9c90f68536&rft.publisher=Western Sydney University&rft.description=This data was collected to answer the question of whether infants attend to linguistic and indexical information in vowel perception. Australian-English-learning and Dutch-learning 12-month-olds were played strings of vowel tokens from a central speaker. To measure their attention to the auditory stimulus, a Tobii eyetracker sampling at 120 Hz tracked their attention to a monitor in the vicinity of the speaker. Infants were first familiarized to eight 13-second trials containing repetitions of two tokens of the vowel /ɪ/ spoken by a female speaker of North Holland Dutch (trials Fam1 - Fam8). Infants were then presented with two blocks of three different test trial types, presented in random order within block: NoChange, which presented the same two tokens as in familiarization; VowelChange, in which infants heard the same vowel /ɪ/ alternated with tokens of the vowel /ɛ/ produced by the same speaker; and the IndexicalChange trial, which was either a Speaker Change, meaning that infants heard the same vowel /ɪ/ spoken by the familiarized speaker, alternated with tokens of the vowel /ɪ/ spoken by another female speaker of North Holland Dutch, or an Accent Change, in which tokens of the same vowel /ɪ/ spoken by the familiarized speaker were alternated with tokens of the vowel /ɪ/ spoken by a female speaker of another accent of Dutch, East Flemish Dutch. Data for each trial are infants' cumulative looking time in ms for each 13-second trial. If infants attended to the linguistic or indexical change in auditory stimulus, we would expect increased looking to that trial relative to the NoChange trial.&rft.creator=Paola Escudero&rft.creator=Karen Mulak&rft.date=2017&rft.relation=10.1371/journal.pone.0176762&rft.coverage=Western Sydney University&rft.coverage=University of Amsterdam &rft_rights=CC BY 4.0: Attribution 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=Infant Speech Processing&rft_subject=Indexical Vs. Linguistic Information&rft_subject=Normalization&rft_subject=Linguistic Processes (Incl. Speech Production and Comprehension)&rft_subject=Psychology and Cognitive Sciences&rft_subject=Cognitive Science&rft_subject=Developmental Psychology and Ageing&rft_subject=Psychology&rft_subject=Pure Basic Research&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

CC BY 4.0: Attribution 4.0 International
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Access:

Open view details

Dataset is available via the Western Sydney University ResearchDirect record under Attachments section
https://doi.org/10.4225/35/58d9c90f68536

Contact Information

K.Mulak@westernsydney.edu.au
Western Sydney University

Full description

This data was collected to answer the question of whether infants attend to linguistic and indexical information in vowel perception. Australian-English-learning and Dutch-learning 12-month-olds were played strings of vowel tokens from a central speaker. To measure their attention to the auditory stimulus, a Tobii eyetracker sampling at 120 Hz tracked their attention to a monitor in the vicinity of the speaker.

Infants were first familiarized to eight 13-second trials containing repetitions of two tokens of the vowel /ɪ/ spoken by a female speaker of North Holland Dutch (trials Fam1 - Fam8). Infants were then presented with two blocks of three different test trial types, presented in random order within block:

  • NoChange, which presented the same two tokens as in familiarization;
  • VowelChange, in which infants heard the same vowel /ɪ/ alternated with tokens of the vowel /ɛ/ produced by the same speaker; and the
  • IndexicalChange trial, which was either a Speaker Change, meaning that infants heard the same vowel /ɪ/ spoken by the familiarized speaker, alternated with tokens of the vowel /ɪ/ spoken by another female speaker of North Holland Dutch, or an Accent Change, in which tokens of the same vowel /ɪ/ spoken by the familiarized speaker were alternated with tokens of the vowel /ɪ/ spoken by a female speaker of another accent of Dutch, East Flemish Dutch.

Data for each trial are infants' cumulative looking time in ms for each 13-second trial. If infants attended to the linguistic or indexical change in auditory stimulus, we would expect increased looking to that trial relative to the NoChange trial.

Created: 16 03 2017

Click to explore relationships graph

Spatial Coverage And Location

text: Western Sydney University

text: University of Amsterdam

Identifiers