Dataset

First Episode Mania Study, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre

The University of Melbourne
Professor Michael Berk (Owned by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft.title=First Episode Mania Study, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre&rft.publisher=The University of Melbourne&rft.description=Bipolar disorder remains substantially under-researched in comparison to most other conditions such as depression and schizophrenia. The usual treatment for bipolar disorder is a combination of lithium and antipsychotics. The purpose of this project is to increase the understanding of how a medication, quetiapine, can assist with the symptoms of bipolar disorder including changes in mood and thought processes. We also seek to increase our understanding of how quetiapine can act as a protective agent for changes in the brain related to episodes of bipolar disorder. Previous experience has shown that quetiapine is effective as a single medication and in combination with medicines such as lithium for bipolar disorder in adult populations, without major side effects. Quetiapine is well established and routine in those aged 18 years and over, however there is little research conducted in those below the age of 18 years old. This project seeks to assess the effects of the medication on symptoms and thought processes and whether it can be used as a mood stabiliser. More research is also required to see whether quetiapine is similar to lithium in being a protective medication for episode-related changes in the brain. A total of 82 people with bipolar disorder will be approached to be involved in this trial with 52 of these hopefully completing all stages of testing. An additional 30 people who have never experienced a mental disorder will participate in the neuropsychology and MRI components of the study. Patients will be recruited from Orygen Youth Health and Southern Health centres, controls will be recruited from an advertisement published in local magazines, OYH website and word of mouth. Time period: 2008-present&rft.creator=Professor Michael Berk&rft.date=2013&rft_subject=NEUROSCIENCES&rft_subject=MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Full description

Bipolar disorder remains substantially under-researched in comparison to most other conditions such as depression and schizophrenia. The usual treatment for bipolar disorder is a combination of lithium and antipsychotics. The purpose of this project is to increase the understanding of how a medication, quetiapine, can assist with the symptoms of bipolar disorder including changes in mood and thought processes. We also seek to increase our understanding of how quetiapine can act as a protective agent for changes in the brain related to episodes of bipolar disorder.

Previous experience has shown that quetiapine is effective as a single medication and in combination with medicines such as lithium for bipolar disorder in adult populations, without major side effects. Quetiapine is well established and routine in those aged 18 years and over, however there is little research conducted in those below the age of 18 years old. This project seeks to assess the effects of the medication on symptoms and thought processes and whether it can be used as a mood stabiliser. More research is also required to see whether quetiapine is similar to lithium in being a protective medication for episode-related changes in the brain.

A total of 82 people with bipolar disorder will be approached to be involved in this trial with 52 of these hopefully completing all stages of testing. An additional 30 people who have never experienced a mental disorder will participate in the neuropsychology and MRI components of the study. Patients will be recruited from Orygen Youth Health and Southern Health centres, controls will be recruited from an advertisement published in local magazines, OYH website and word of mouth.

Time period: 2008-present
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