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Evaluating global paleoshoreline models for the Cretaceous and Cenozoic

The University of Sydney
Australian Research Council (Funded by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4227/11/5587A89F4EE56&rft.title=Evaluating global paleoshoreline models for the Cretaceous and Cenozoic&rft.identifier=http://dx.doi.org/10.4227/11/5587A89F4EE56&rft.publisher=The University of Sydney&rft.description=This data collection is associated with the publication: Heine, C., Yeo, L. G., & Müller, R. D. (2015). Evaluating global paleoshoreline models for the Cretaceous and Cenozoic. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 1-13. doi: 10.1080/08120099.2015.1018321Publication AbstractPaleoshoreline maps represent the distribution of land and sea through geological time. These compilations provide excellent proxies for evaluating the contributions non-tectonic vertical crustal motions, such as mantle convection-driven dynamic topography, to the flooding histories of continental platforms. Until now, such data have not been available as a globally coherent compilation. Here, we present and evaluate a set of Cretaceous and Cenozoic global shoreline data extracted from two independent published global paleogeographic atlases. We evaluate computed flooding extents derived from the global paleoshoreline models with paleo-environment interpretations from fossils and geological outcrops and compare flooding trends with published eustatic sea-level curves. Although the implied global flooding histories of the two models are similar in the Cenozoic, they differ more substantially in the Cretaceous. This increase in consistency between paleoshoreline maps with the fossil record from the Cretaceous to the Cenozoic likely reflects the increase in the fossil preservation potential in younger geological times. Comparisons between the two models and the Paleogeographic Atlas of Australia on a regional scale in Australia reveal a higher consistency with fossil data for one model over the others in the mid-Cretaceous and suggest that a review of the interpretation of the Late Cretaceous–Cenozoic paleogeography may be necessary. The paleoshoreline maps and associated paleobiology data constraining marine vs terrestrial environments are provided freely as reconstructable GPlates-compatible digital files and form a basis for evaluating the output of geodynamic models predicting regional dynamic surface topography.Authors and InstitutionsChristian Heine - EarthByte Research Group, School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, AustraliaLogan G. Yeo - EarthByte Research Group, School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, AustraliaR. Dietmar Müller - EarthByte Research Group, School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, Australia. ORCID: 0000-0002-3334-5764Overview of Resources ContainedA digital compilation of global paleoshorelines from the Golonka (2007, 2009) and Smith et al. (1994) paleogeographic models. These data are available in ESRI Shapefile and GPlates GPML formats, and can be interacted with using the plate reconstruction software GPlates (www.gplates.org), as well as ArcGIS and QGIS. [References: Golonka, J. (2007). Phanerozoic paleoenvironment and paleolithofacies maps: Mesozoic. Geologia / Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie, Vol. 33: 2, 211-264; Golonka , J. (2009). Phanerozoic paleoenvironment and paleolithofacies maps: Cenozoic. Geologia / Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie, Vol. 35: 4, 507-587; Smith A., Smith D. G. & Furnell B. M. (1994). Atlas of Mesozoic and Cenozoic coastlines, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 112 p]&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2015&rft.relation=http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08120099.2015.1018321&rft.coverage=Global&rft_rights=CC BY-NC-SA: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/&rft_subject=Sea Level&rft_subject=Global&rft_subject=Fossils&rft_subject=Paleoshorelines&rft_subject=Mapping&rft_subject=Continental Platforms&rft_subject=Paleoshoreline Models&rft_subject=Flooding History&rft_subject=Paleogeographic Atlas of Australia&rft_subject=Australia&rft_subject=Tectonics&rft_subject=Earth Sciences&rft_subject=Geology&rft_subject=Structural Geology&rft_subject=Marine Geoscience&rft_subject=Palaeontology (Incl. Palynology)&rft_subject=Petroleum and Coal Geology&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge&rft_subject=Pure Basic Research&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Provider

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This data collection is associated with the publication: Heine, C., Yeo, L. G., & Müller, R. D. (2015). Evaluating global paleoshoreline models for the Cretaceous and Cenozoic. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 1-13. doi: 10.1080/08120099.2015.1018321

Publication Abstract

Paleoshoreline maps represent the distribution of land and sea through geological time. These compilations provide excellent proxies for evaluating the contributions non-tectonic vertical crustal motions, such as mantle convection-driven dynamic topography, to the flooding histories of continental platforms. Until now, such data have not been available as a globally coherent compilation. Here, we present and evaluate a set of Cretaceous and Cenozoic global shoreline data extracted from two independent published global paleogeographic atlases. We evaluate computed flooding extents derived from the global paleoshoreline models with paleo-environment interpretations from fossils and geological outcrops and compare flooding trends with published eustatic sea-level curves. Although the implied global flooding histories of the two models are similar in the Cenozoic, they differ more substantially in the Cretaceous. This increase in consistency between paleoshoreline maps with the fossil record from the Cretaceous to the Cenozoic likely reflects the increase in the fossil preservation potential in younger geological times. Comparisons between the two models and the Paleogeographic Atlas of Australia on a regional scale in Australia reveal a higher consistency with fossil data for one model over the others in the mid-Cretaceous and suggest that a review of the interpretation of the Late Cretaceous–Cenozoic paleogeography may be necessary. The paleoshoreline maps and associated paleobiology data constraining marine vs terrestrial environments are provided freely as reconstructable GPlates-compatible digital files and form a basis for evaluating the output of geodynamic models predicting regional dynamic surface topography.

Authors and Institutions

Christian Heine - EarthByte Research Group, School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, Australia

Logan G. Yeo - EarthByte Research Group, School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, Australia

R. Dietmar Müller - EarthByte Research Group, School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, Australia. ORCID: 0000-0002-3334-5764

Overview of Resources Contained

A digital compilation of global paleoshorelines from the Golonka (2007, 2009) and Smith et al. (1994) paleogeographic models. These data are available in ESRI Shapefile and GPlates GPML formats, and can be interacted with using the plate reconstruction software GPlates (www.gplates.org), as well as ArcGIS and QGIS. [References: Golonka, J. (2007). Phanerozoic paleoenvironment and paleolithofacies maps: Mesozoic. Geologia / Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie, Vol. 33: 2, 211-264; Golonka , J. (2009). Phanerozoic paleoenvironment and paleolithofacies maps: Cenozoic. Geologia / Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie, Vol. 35: 4, 507-587; Smith A., Smith D. G. & Furnell B. M. (1994). Atlas of Mesozoic and Cenozoic coastlines, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 112 p]

Data time period: Cretaceous and Cenozoic

Spatial Coverage And Location

text: Global