Dataset

Examining the origins of the word frequency effect in episodic recognition memory and its relationship to the word frequency effect in lexical memory

The University of Newcastle, Australia
Andrew Heathcote (Associated with) Andrew Heathcote (Associated with)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/807086&rft.title=Examining the origins of the word frequency effect in episodic recognition memory and its relationship to the word frequency effect in lexical memory&rft.identifier=http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/807086&rft.publisher=The University of Newcastle, Australia&rft.description=Two experiments investigated Estes and Maddox’ theory (2002) that word frequency mirror effect in episodic recognition memory is due to word likeness rather than frequency of experience with a word. In Experiment 1, sixteen first year psychology students at the University of Newcastle studied lists of high and low frequency words crossed with high-neighbourhood-density and low-neighbourhood-density words and were given an episodic recognition test and asked to rate words as new or old and provide ratings of confidence according to a three point scale with six possible responses: sure old, probably old, possibly old, possibly new, probably new and sure new. Experiment 2 included twenty-three first year psychology students at the University of Newcastle who were tested using lexical decision task lists of words and nonwords. Testing was undertaken on a computer that presented the stimuli and recorded the participants’ responses using a program written in Turbo Pascal 6.0 with millisecond accurate timing.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2011&rft.relation=http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/26700&rft_subject=Episodic Recognition Memory&rft_subject=Lexical Memory&rft_subject=Mirror Effect&rft_subject=Psychology&rft_subject=Psychology and Cognitive Sciences&rft_subject=Attention Likelihood Theory&rft_subject=Lexical Access&rft_subject=Recognition (Learning)&rft_subject=Neighbourhoods&rft_subject=Episodic Memory&rft_subject=Word Frequency&rft_subject=Orthography&rft_subject=Memory&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Provider

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Access to this dataset is supplied on condition that the chief investigator associated with this dataset is credited in any publications that use the data.

Contact Information

University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan NSW 2308

Brief description

Two experiments investigated Estes and Maddox’ theory (2002) that word frequency mirror effect in episodic recognition memory is due to word likeness rather than frequency of experience with a word. In Experiment 1, sixteen first year psychology students at the University of Newcastle studied lists of high and low frequency words crossed with high-neighbourhood-density and low-neighbourhood-density words and were given an episodic recognition test and asked to rate words as new or old and provide ratings of confidence according to a three point scale with six possible responses: sure old, probably old, possibly old, possibly new, probably new and sure new. Experiment 2 included twenty-three first year psychology students at the University of Newcastle who were tested using lexical decision task lists of words and nonwords. Testing was undertaken on a computer that presented the stimuli and recorded the participants’ responses using a program written in Turbo Pascal 6.0 with millisecond accurate timing.

Notes

The dataset contains one Microsoft Excel file in .xls format containing data for Experiments 1 and 2.

Data time period: 2006 to 12 2006