Dataset
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4227/39/560c67c425b87&rft.title=Herbivorous fish assemblages and herbivory rates on coral reefs in Moreton Bay, Australia&rft.identifier=10.4227/39/560c67c425b87&rft.publisher=University of the Sunshine Coast&rft.description=This data was collected to test whether ecological function, measured as browsing and grazing herbivory, is affected by marine reserves and connectivity between reefs and mangroves. The data includes: 1. Herbivore biomass, calculated as the weight of each herbivorous fish species on each UVC transect conducted at each of 15 reefs; 2. Turf grazing rates, for each deployment at each of reef; 3. Macroalgae browsing rates, for each deployment at each of reef; and 4. Water quality data, including salinity, turbidity, total nitrogen and a water quality index, for each reef. The results of these data are published in Resource type influences the effects of reserves and connectivity on ecological functions in Journal of Animal Ecology in 2015. Format: MS Excel (71KB) Investigators:  Nicholas A Yabsley (University of the Sunshine Coast) Andrew D Olds (University of the Sunshine Coast) Rod M Connolly (Griffith University) Tyson S H Martin (Griffith University) Ben Gilby (University of the Sunshine Coast) Paul S Maxwell (University of Queensland) Chantal M Huijbers (University of the Sunshine Coast) David SSchoeman (University of the Sunshine Coast) Thomas Schlacher (University of the Sunshine Coast) &rft.creator=Yabsley, Nicholas A &rft.creator=Olds, Andrew D &rft.creator=Connolly, Rod M &rft.creator=Martin, Tyson S H &rft.creator=Gilby, Ben &rft.creator=Maxwell, Paul S &rft.creator=Huijbers, Chantal M &rft.creator=Schoeman, David S &rft.creator=Schlacher, Thomas &rft.date=2015&rft.coverage=153.259521,-27.289978&rft_rights=Copyright © 2015 University of the Sunshine Coast&rft_rights= http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_subject=Spatial Conservation&rft_subject=Landscape Ecology&rft_subject=Resource Type&rft_subject=Ecological Functioning&rft_subject=Fish&rft_subject=Coral Reef&rft_subject=Mangrove&rft_subject=Australia&rft_subject=Environmental Science and Management&rft_subject=Environmental Sciences&rft_place=Australia&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Copyright © 2015 University of the Sunshine Coast

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Brief description

This data was collected to test whether ecological function, measured as browsing and grazing herbivory, is affected by marine reserves and connectivity between reefs and mangroves. The data includes: 1. Herbivore biomass, calculated as the weight of each herbivorous fish species on each UVC transect conducted at each of 15 reefs; 2. Turf grazing rates, for each deployment at each of reef; 3. Macroalgae browsing rates, for each deployment at each of reef; and 4. Water quality data, including salinity, turbidity, total nitrogen and a water quality index, for each reef. The results of these data are published in "Resource type influences the effects of reserves and connectivity on ecological functions" in Journal of Animal Ecology in 2015.

Format: MS Excel (71KB)

Investigators

  • Nicholas A Yabsley (University of the Sunshine Coast)
  • Andrew D Olds (University of the Sunshine Coast)
  • Rod M Connolly (Griffith University)
  • Tyson S H Martin (Griffith University)
  • Ben Gilby (University of the Sunshine Coast)
  • Paul S Maxwell (University of Queensland)
  • Chantal M Huijbers (University of the Sunshine Coast)
  • David SSchoeman (University of the Sunshine Coast)
  • Thomas Schlacher (University of the Sunshine Coast)

Issued: 2015

Data time period: 2014-06 to 2014-08

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153.259521,-27.289978

153.259521,-27.289978

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