Dataset

Malay Concordance Project - collection

Also known as: MCP - collection
The Australian National University
I Proudfoot (Owned by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4225/13/50CA90992AE1F&rft.title=Malay Concordance Project - collection&rft.identifier=10.4225/13/50CA90992AE1F&rft.publisher=The Australian National University&rft.description=The Malay Concordance Project (MCP) utilizes computer technology to create a rich concordance of classical Malay literature, with the aim of helping scholars share resources for the study of this literature. The focus of the collection is a growing corpus of classical Malay texts, comprising (as of the year 2012) 165 texts and 5.8 million words, including 140,000 verses. These texts can be searched on-line to provide useful information about: *contexts in which words are used. *where particular terms or names occur in texts. *patterns of morphology and syntax. In the space of a single year the MCP collection was consulted by scholars from more than 30 countries world-wide, who made over 20,000 searches. The collection ranges from classical and pre-modern Malay to vernacular newspaper texts. Until the early twentieth century, a scholarly edition of a classical Malay text might use the Jawi script, which was adapted from Arabic. But during the twentieth century, in Indonesia and Malaysia, Arabic script has been largely displaced by Roman spelling. Modern editions of classical Malay texts are now published in Roman script, both to make the text accessible to modern readers, and because the Roman spellings are complete phonemically. The MCP therefore includes texts based on Roman transcriptions of manuscript material. The texts are listed both alphabetically and chronologically. Researchers may search individual texts, categories of texts or the entire collection for words and phrases. The site may be useful to those interested in Malay studies (including literature, history and culture) and linguisitics. The centrepiece of this collection is a growing corpus of classical Malay texts, comprising (as of the year 2012) 165 texts and 5.8 million words, including 140,000 verses. In the space of a single year it was consulted by scholars from more than 30 countries world-wide, who made over 20,000 searches. &rft.creator=Proudfoot, Ian &rft.date=1991&rft.relation=http://mcp.anu.edu.au/papers/CCM.html#Introduction&rft.coverage=Malay Peninsula; Malay Archipelago&rft_rights=These Web pages are subject to the Australian National University's copyright policy. http://legaloffice.weblogs.anu.edu.au/content/copyright Limited copying or downloading of search results is permitted only as ‘fair dealing’ for the purposes of individual research. The Project is not able to offer access to the full texts. This restriction is necessary to protect the interests of copyright holders involved in publishing the texts, supplying copies of the texts, or indexing the texts for inclusion in the project. The exception is the newspaper extracts provided by the National University of Singapore, which can be copied freely for purposes of research.&rft_subject=Indonesian Languages&rft_subject=Language, Communication and Culture&rft_subject=Language Studies&rft_subject=South-East Asian Languages (Excl. Indonesian)&rft_subject=Asian Literature&rft_subject=Asian Studies&rft_subject=Classical Malay&rft_subject=Concordance&rft_subject=Hikayat&rft_subject=Language Studies&rft_subject=Malay &rft_subject=Malay History&rft_subject=Malay Language&rft_subject=Malay Literature&rft_subject=Malay Morphology&rft_subject=Malay Syntax&rft_subject=Malay Text&rft_subject=Syair&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Providers

Licence & Rights:

view details

These Web pages are subject to the Australian National University's copyright policy.

http://legaloffice.weblogs.anu.edu.au/content/copyright

Limited copying or downloading of search results is permitted only as ‘fair dealing’ for the purposes of individual research.

The Project is not able to offer access to the full texts. This restriction is necessary to protect the interests of copyright holders involved in publishing the texts, supplying copies of the texts, or indexing the texts for inclusion in the project. The exception is the newspaper extracts provided by the National University of Singapore, which can be copied freely for purposes of research.

Access:

Other view details

According to the MCP website the following access conditions apply:

Let me know if you find errors or inconsistencies;
acknowledge the project in the footnotes and bibliography of anything your write
(if you are using a particular text, also mention its contributor, or its printed edition);
contribute new texts if you have them in digital form

Contact Information

ea.chl@anu.edu.au

Ph: +61 2 6125 6364

School of Culture, History & Language ANU College of Asia & the Pacific

Full description

The Malay Concordance Project (MCP) utilizes computer technology to create a rich concordance of classical Malay literature, with the aim of helping scholars share resources for the study of this literature. The focus of the collection is a growing corpus of classical Malay texts, comprising (as of the year 2012) 165 texts and 5.8 million words, including 140,000 verses. These texts can be searched on-line to provide useful information about:

*contexts in which words are used.
*where particular terms or names occur in texts.
*patterns of morphology and syntax.

In the space of a single year the MCP collection was consulted by scholars from more than 30 countries world-wide, who made over 20,000 searches.

The collection ranges from classical and pre-modern Malay to vernacular newspaper texts. Until the early twentieth century, a scholarly edition of a classical Malay text might use the Jawi script, which was adapted from Arabic. But during the twentieth century, in Indonesia and Malaysia, Arabic script has been largely displaced by Roman spelling. Modern editions of classical Malay texts are now published in Roman script, both to make the text accessible to modern readers, and because the Roman spellings are complete phonemically. The MCP therefore includes texts based on Roman transcriptions of manuscript material.

The texts are listed both alphabetically and chronologically. Researchers may search individual texts, categories of texts or the entire collection for words and phrases.

The site may be useful to those interested in Malay studies (including literature, history and culture) and linguisitics.

Significance statement

The centrepiece of this collection is a growing corpus of classical Malay texts, comprising (as of the year 2012) 165 texts and 5.8 million words, including 140,000 verses. In the space of a single year it was consulted by scholars from more than 30 countries world-wide, who made over 20,000 searches.

Data time period: 1302 to 1953

Spatial Coverage And Location

text: Malay Peninsula; Malay Archipelago