Dataset

Maps of clay minerals - kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Raphael Viscarra Rossel (Managed by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4225/08/55DFFCA4715D8&rft.title=Maps of clay minerals - kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils&rft.identifier=10.4225/08/55DFFCA4715D8&rft.publisher=Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)&rft.description=Clay minerals are the most reactive inorganic components of soils. They help to determine soil properties and largely govern their behaviors and functions. Clay minerals also play important roles in biogeochemical cycling and interact with the environment to affect geomorphic processes such as weathering, erosion and deposition. This data provides new spatially explicit clay mineralogy information for Australia that will help to improve our understanding of soils and their role in the functioning of landscapes and ecosystems. I measured the abundances of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Using a model-tree algorithm, I built rule-based models for each mineral at two depths (0-20 cm, 60-80 cm) as a function of predictors that represent the soil-forming factors (climate, parent material, relief, vegetation and time), their processes and the scales at which they vary. The results show that climate, parent material and soil type exert the largest influence on the abundance and spatial distribution of the clay minerals; relief and vegetation have more local effects. I digitally mapped each mineral on a 3 arc-second grid. The maps show the relative abundances and distributions of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils. Kaolinite occurs in a range of climates but dominates in deeply weathered soils, in soils of higher landscapes and in regions with more rain. Illite is present in varied landscapes and may be representative of colder, more arid climates, but may also be present in warmer and wetter soil environments. Smectite is often an authigenic mineral, formed from the weathering of basalt, but it also occurs on sediments and calcareous substrates. It occurs predominantly in drier climates and in landscapes with low relief. These new clay mineral maps fill a significant gap in the availability of soil mineralogical information. They provide data to for example, assist with research into soil fertility and food production, carbon sequestration, land degradation, dust and climate modeling and paleoclimatic change. Attributes: Units of measurement: 1. Abundance of kaolin (0 - 1) for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths; 2. Abundance of illite (0 - 1) for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths; 3. Abundance of smectite (0 - 1) for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths; 4. Ternary RGB image of mineral composition for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths. For details please see Viscarra Rossel (2011). Data Type: Float Grid. Kaolinite, illite, smectite composite maps in GEOTIFF format. Map projections: Geographic. Datum: GDA94 Map units: Decimal degrees. Resolution: 0.00083333333 degrees. File Header Information: ncols 48874; nrows 40373; xllcorner 112.91246795654; yllcorner -43.642475129116; cellsize 0.00083333333333333; NODATA_value -9999; byteorder LSBFIRST.&rft.creator=Viscarra Rossel, Raphael &rft.date=2015&rft.edition=v1&rft.coverage=northlimit=-9.98125; southlimit=-44.00125; westlimit=112.99875; eastLimit=154.01625; projection=WGS84&rft_rights=All Rights (including copyright) CSIRO Australia 2014.&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/&rft_subject=Tern_Soils&rft_subject=Tern_Soils_Dsm&rft_subject=Clay Minerals&rft_subject=Digital Soil Mapping&rft_subject=Near Infrared&rft_subject=Predictive Spatial Modelling&rft_subject=Soil Sciences Not Elsewhere Classified&rft_subject=Environmental Sciences&rft_subject=Soil Sciences&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

All Rights (including copyright) CSIRO Australia 2014.

Access:

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Data is accessible online and may be reused in accordance with licence conditions

Brief description

Clay minerals are the most reactive inorganic components of soils. They help to determine soil properties and largely govern their behaviors and functions. Clay minerals also play important roles in biogeochemical cycling and interact with the environment to affect geomorphic processes such as weathering, erosion and deposition. This data provides new spatially explicit clay mineralogy information for Australia that will help to improve our understanding of soils and their role in the functioning of landscapes and ecosystems. I measured the abundances of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Using a model-tree algorithm, I built rule-based models for each mineral at two depths (0-20 cm, 60-80 cm) as a function of predictors that represent the soil-forming factors (climate, parent material, relief, vegetation and time), their processes and the scales at which they vary. The results show that climate, parent material and soil type exert the largest influence on the abundance and spatial distribution of the clay minerals; relief and vegetation have more local effects. I digitally mapped each mineral on a 3 arc-second grid. The maps show the relative abundances and distributions of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils. Kaolinite occurs in a range of climates but dominates in deeply weathered soils, in soils of higher landscapes and in regions with more rain. Illite is present in varied landscapes and may be representative of colder, more arid climates, but may also be present in warmer and wetter soil environments. Smectite is often an authigenic mineral, formed from the weathering of basalt, but it also occurs on sediments and calcareous substrates. It occurs predominantly in drier climates and in landscapes with low relief. These new clay mineral maps fill a significant gap in the availability of soil mineralogical information. They provide data to for example, assist with research into soil fertility and food production, carbon sequestration, land degradation, dust and climate modeling and paleoclimatic change.

Attributes:
Units of measurement:
1. Abundance of kaolin (0 - 1) for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths;
2. Abundance of illite (0 - 1) for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths;
3. Abundance of smectite (0 - 1) for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths;
4. Ternary RGB image of mineral composition for the 0-20 cm and 60-80 cm depths.

For details please see Viscarra Rossel (2011).

Data Type: Float Grid.
Kaolinite, illite, smectite composite maps in GEOTIFF format.

Map projections: Geographic.

Datum: GDA94

Map units: Decimal degrees.

Resolution: 0.00083333333 degrees.

File Header Information:
ncols 48874;
nrows 40373;
xllcorner 112.91246795654;
yllcorner -43.642475129116;
cellsize 0.00083333333333333;
NODATA_value -9999;
byteorder LSBFIRST.
Click to explore relationships graph

154.01625,-9.98125 154.01625,-44.00125 112.99875,-44.00125 112.99875,-9.98125 154.01625,-9.98125

133.5075,-26.99125

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