Dataset

Melbourne University Medical History Museum Microscopy

Museum Metadata Exchange
Medical History Museum, Melbourne University (Managed by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://www.jnmhugateways.unimelb.edu.au/mhm/MHMS023.htm#MHM00013&rft.title=Melbourne University Medical History Museum Microscopy&rft.identifier=MHM001&rft.publisher=Museum Metadata Exchange&rft.description=The Microscopy collection at the Medical History Museum includes dozens of examples of simple and compound microscopes from 1800-1950. Included are monocular and binocular microscopes; lenses; lamps; and sets of slides. Some of the more interesting individual items include: a compound microscope made by Watson and Sons around 1860; a Zeiss microscope used by Sir Harry Allen in the Pathology Department; a drum monocular microscope probably made by Dolland of London around 1820; an early 1860s Powell and Lealand with interchangeable nosepiece and a Leeuwenhoek simple microscope, mounted on a wooden display block probably made by Copie of Leiden. Dr. W.H. Royal's 200 piece portable travelling laboratory with all the materials needed to make stained slide mounts from fresh samples. Owned by Dr. W.H. Royal of Castle Combe, England and used by a Missionary Doctor to Africa. A Japanese microscope found in the tunnels at Rabaul, New Guinea at the end of World War Two.The Microscopy collection at the Medical History Museum includes dozens of examples of simple and compound microscopes from 1800-1950. Included are monocular and binocular microscopes; lenses; lamps; and sets of slides.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2017&rft.coverage=Melbourne, Victoria, Australia&rft.coverage=Africa&rft.coverage=Japan&rft.coverage=Rabaul&rft.coverage=New Guinea&rft_subject=Allen&rft_subject=Copie&rft_subject=Dolland&rft_subject=Harry&rft_subject=Lealand&rft_subject=Leeuwenhoek&rft_subject=Pathology&rft_subject=Powell&rft_subject=Sir&rft_subject=W.h. Royal&rft_subject=Watson and Sons&rft_subject=Zeiss&rft_subject=Binocular&rft_subject=Compound&rft_subject=Health&rft_subject=Lamps&rft_subject=Lenses&rft_subject=Medical History&rft_subject=Medicine&rft_subject=Microscopes&rft_subject=Microscopy&rft_subject=Missionaries&rft_subject=Monocular&rft_subject=Science&rft_subject=Scientific Instruments&rft_subject=Simple&rft_subject=Slides&rft_subject=Travelling Laboratory&rft_subject=World War Two&rft_subject=Diseases&rft_subject=Instrumentation&rft_subject=Medical Equipment&rft_subject=Optical Instruments&rft_subject=Scientific Instruments&rft_subject=Scientists&rft_subject=Social History&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Please contact the Medical History Museum, Cultural Collections, University of Melbourne

Please contact the Medical History Museum, Cultural Collections, University of Melbourne

Brief description

The Microscopy collection at the Medical History Museum includes dozens of examples of simple and compound microscopes from 1800-1950. Included are monocular and binocular microscopes; lenses; lamps; and sets of slides.

Full description

The Microscopy collection at the Medical History Museum includes dozens of examples of simple and compound microscopes from 1800-1950. Included are monocular and binocular microscopes; lenses; lamps; and sets of slides. Some of the more interesting individual items include: a compound microscope made by Watson and Sons around 1860; a Zeiss microscope used by Sir Harry Allen in the Pathology Department; a drum monocular microscope probably made by Dolland of London around 1820; an early 1860s Powell and Lealand with interchangeable nosepiece and a Leeuwenhoek simple microscope, mounted on a wooden display block probably made by Copie of Leiden. Dr. W.H. Royal's 200 piece portable travelling laboratory with all the materials needed to make stained slide mounts from fresh samples. Owned by Dr. W.H. Royal of Castle Combe, England and used by a Missionary Doctor to Africa. A Japanese microscope found in the tunnels at Rabaul, New Guinea at the end of World War Two.

Significance

This collection contains a range of medical and scientific instruments of significance to the history of Science in Australia.

Data time period: 1800 to 1950

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Spatial Coverage And Location

text: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

text: Africa

text: Japan

text: Rabaul

text: New Guinea