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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/metadata_redirect.cfm?md=ASAC_244&rft.title=Photosynthetic Attributes of Antarctic Plants&rft.identifier= http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/metadata_redirect.cfm?md=ASAC_244&rft.publisher=Australian Antarctic Data Centre&rft.description=Metadata record for data from ASAC Project 244 See the link below for public details on this project. From the abstracts of the referenced papers: Photoinhibition of Grimmia antarctici (Grimmia is now known as Schistidium) during the summer at Casey, East Antarctica, was indicated by a reduction in photosynthetic capacity (light saturated photosynthetic rate), photosynthetic efficiency (photon yield of O2 evolution), photochemical quantum yield (ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence) and rate of fluorescence quenching when plants were exposed to moderate light at low temperature. We suggest that photoinhibition is a major factor limiting bryophyte productivity in Antarctic ecosystems. Variation in leaf pigmentation from green to ginger is observed for Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. in Antarctica. Electron microscopy of ginger and green leaves reveals less thylakoid stacking, a response to greater light exposure, in the ginger leaves. In extremely exposed sites C. purpureus has low chlorophyll a/b ratios which correlate with decreased 77K chlorophyll fluorescence, indicating damage to chlorophyll a. Pigment analysis of ginger moss shows that even when the chlorophyll a/b ratio has not decreased the pigment composition differs from green moss. The increase in anthocyanin and decrease in chlorophyll concentrations largely account for the visual change from green to ginger. The ratio of total carotenoid to chlorophyll varies from 0.35 in green moss to 0.55 in the ginger moss, with violaxanthin increased preferentially. Since these changes in pigmentation are consistent with photoprotection and they are linked to light depended variations in chloroplast structure, it appears that photoprotective pigments are a useful adaptation for the bright Antarctic environment.&rft.creator=ADAMSON (DECEASED), HEATHER &rft.date=2000&rft.coverage=northlimit=-66.0; southlimit=-67.0; westlimit=110.0; eastLimit=111.0; projection=WGS84&rft.coverage=northlimit=-66.0; southlimit=-67.0; westlimit=110.0; eastLimit=111.0; projection=WGS84&rft_rights= http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/&rft_rights=This data set conforms to the PICCCBY Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). Please follow instructions listed in the citation reference provided at http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/citation.cfm?entry_id=ASAC_244 when using these data.&rft_subject=Biota&rft_subject=Photosynthetically Active Radiation&rft_subject=Earth Science&rft_subject=Biosphere&rft_subject=Vegetation&rft_subject=Pigments&rft_subject=Plant Characteristics&rft_subject=Mosses/hornworts/liverworts&rft_subject=Biological Classification&rft_subject=Plants&rft_subject=Photosynthesis&rft_subject=Ecological Dynamics&rft_subject=Ecosystem Functions&rft_subject=Pigments&rft_subject=Photosynthesis&rft_subject=Photoprotective&rft_subject=Casey&rft_subject=Moss&rft_subject=Ceratodon Purpureus&rft_subject=Grimmia Antarctici&rft_subject=Schistidium Antarctici&rft_subject=Hplc > High-Performance Liquid Chromatograph&rft_subject=Oxygen Meters&rft_subject=Spectrophotometers&rft_subject=Fluorometers&rft_subject=Laboratory&rft_subject=Field Investigation&rft_subject=Continent > Antarctica > Casey&rft_subject=Geographic Region > Polar&rft_place=Hobart&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

This data set conforms to the PICCCBY Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). Please follow instructions listed in the citation reference provided at http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/citation.cfm?entry_id=ASAC_244 when using these data.

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Brief description

Metadata record for data from ASAC Project 244 See the
link below for public details on this project.

From the abstracts of the referenced papers:

Photoinhibition of Grimmia antarctici (Grimmia is now known as Schistidium) during the summer at Casey, East Antarctica, was indicated by a reduction in photosynthetic capacity (light saturated photosynthetic rate), photosynthetic efficiency (photon yield of O2 evolution), photochemical quantum yield (ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence) and rate of fluorescence quenching when plants were exposed to moderate light at low temperature. We suggest that photoinhibition is a major factor limiting bryophyte productivity in Antarctic ecosystems.

Variation in leaf pigmentation from green to ginger is observed for Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. in Antarctica. Electron microscopy of ginger and green leaves reveals less thylakoid stacking, a response to greater light exposure, in the ginger leaves. In extremely exposed sites C. purpureus has low chlorophyll a/b ratios which correlate with decreased 77K chlorophyll fluorescence, indicating damage to chlorophyll a. Pigment analysis of ginger moss shows that even when the chlorophyll a/b ratio has not decreased the pigment composition differs from green moss. The increase in anthocyanin and decrease in chlorophyll concentrations largely account for the visual change from green to ginger. The ratio of total carotenoid to chlorophyll varies from 0.35 in green moss to 0.55 in the ginger moss, with violaxanthin increased preferentially. Since these changes in pigmentation are consistent with photoprotection and they are linked to light depended variations in chloroplast structure, it appears that photoprotective pigments are a useful adaptation for the bright Antarctic environment.

Issued: 2000-07-20

Data time period: 1986-09-30 to 1988-01-31

Click to explore relationships graph

111,-66 111,-67 110,-67 110,-66 111,-66

110.5,-66.5

text: northlimit=-66.0; southlimit=-67.0; westlimit=110.0; eastLimit=111.0; projection=WGS84