Dataset

Scalloped Hammerhead microsatellite genotypes (eight loci) representing five regions on Australia's east coast and one location in central Indonesia.

Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
Jennifer Ovenden (Aggregated by) Jess Morgan (Aggregated by) Raewyn. Street (Aggregated by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=10378.3/13903&rft.title=Scalloped Hammerhead microsatellite genotypes (eight loci) representing five regions on Australia's east coast and one location in central Indonesia.&rft.identifier=10378.3/13903&rft.publisher=Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry&rft.description=Biodiversity of sharks in the tropical Indo-Pacific is high, but species-specific information to assist sustainable resource exploitation is scarce. The null hypothesis of population genetic homogeneity was tested for scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini, n=244) and the milkshark (Rhizoprionodon acutus, n=209) from northern and eastern Australia, using nuclear (S. lewini, eight microsatellite loci; R. acutus, six loci) and mitochondrial gene markers (873 base pairs of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4). We were unable to reject genetic homogeneity for S. lewini, which was as expected based on previous studies of this species. Less expected were similar results for R. acutus, which is more benthic and less vagile than S. lewini. These features are probably driving the genetic break found between Australian and central Indonesian R. acutus (F-statistics; mtDNA, 0.751 to 0.903; microsatellite loci, 0.038 to 0.047). Our results support the spatially-homogeneous management plan for shark species in Queensland, but caution is advised for species yet to be studied.&rft.creator=Raewyn. Street&rft.creator=Jennifer Ovenden&rft.creator=Jess Morgan&rft.date=2017&rft_subject=Scalloped Hammerhead&rft_subject=Sphyrna Lewini&rft_subject=Genetic Stock Structure&rft_subject=Spatial Dynamics&rft_subject=Fisheries&rft_subject=Genetics&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Provider

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Available under License GILF Attribution.

Contact Information

era.data@deedi.qld.gov.au

Brief description

Biodiversity of sharks in the tropical Indo-Pacific is high, but species-specific information to assist sustainable resource exploitation is scarce. The null hypothesis of population genetic homogeneity was tested for scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini, n=244) and the milkshark (Rhizoprionodon acutus, n=209) from northern and eastern Australia, using nuclear (S. lewini, eight microsatellite loci; R. acutus, six loci) and mitochondrial gene markers (873 base pairs of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4). We were unable to reject genetic homogeneity for S. lewini, which was as expected based on previous studies of this species. Less expected were similar results for R. acutus, which is more benthic and less vagile than S. lewini. These features are probably driving the genetic break found between Australian and central Indonesian R. acutus (F-statistics; mtDNA, 0.751 to 0.903; microsatellite loci, 0.038 to 0.047). Our results support the spatially-homogeneous management plan for shark species in Queensland, but caution is advised for species yet to be studied.

Notes

Stock Structure of Exploited Shark Species in north-eastern Australia, Fisheries Research & Development Corporation Project No. 2007/035.

Data time period: 2007 to 2010

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Identifiers
  • Local : http://era.daf.qld.gov.au/id/eprint/1865/
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