Dataset

Social queuing in a tropical fish

James Cook University
Mark Ian McCormick (Associated with, Aggregated by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4225/28/55AED3D72AEC8&rft.title=Social queuing in a tropical fish&rft.identifier=10.4225/28/55AED3D72AEC8&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=This file contains data sets for the accompanying paper on social queuing in Pomacentrus amboinensis:Abstract [Related Publication]: Membership of the group is a balance between the benefits associated with group living and the cost of socially constrained growth and breeding opportunities, but the costs and benefits are seldom examined. The goal of the present study was to explore the trade-offs associated with group living for a sex-changing, potentially protogynous coral reef fish, the Ambon damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis. Extensive sampling showed that the species exhibits resource defence polygyny, where dominant males guard a nest site that is visited by females. P. amboinensis have a longevity of about 6.5 years on the northern Great Barrier Reef. While the species can change sex consistent with being a protogynous hermaphrodite, it is unclear the extent to which the species uses this capability. Social groups are comprised of one reproductive male, 1-7 females and a number of juveniles. Females live in a linear dominance hierarchy, with the male being more aggressive to the beta-female than the alpha-female, who exhibits lower levels of ovarian cortisol. Surveys and a tagging study indicated that groups were stable for at least three months. A passive integrated transponder tag study showed that males spawn with females from their own group, but also females from neighbouring groups. In situ behavioural observations found that alpha-females have priority of access to the nest site that the male guarded, and access to higher quality foraging areas. Male removal studies suggest that the alpha-females can change sex to take over from the male when the position becomes available, Examination of otolith microstructure showed that those individuals which change sex to males have different embryonic characteristics at hatching, suggesting that success may involve a component that is endowed. The parently endowed. The relative importance of parental effects and social organisation in affecting the importance of female queuing is yet to be studied, but will likely depend on the strength of social control by the dominant members of the group.The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.Data sheets include:Age and size by sexDistance to nestDistance from reef with rankRelative female sixe vs rankMorphology and gender &rft.creator=Mark Ian McCormick&rft.date=2015&rft.relation=http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.2198&rft.coverage=145.47193336243,-14.703170309767 145.47968141756,-14.697354768539 145.48519233885,-14.689507707036 145.48792667893,-14.680397078758 145.48761678153,-14.670914596827 145.48429298158,-14.661988484512 145.47828063576,-14.65449260964 145.47016827439,-14.649160899293 145.46074999192,-14.646515429723 145.45094771544,-14.646815256555 145.44172096009,-14.650031019017 145.43397290496,-14.65584781841 145.42846198367,-14.663696087373 145.4257276436,-14.672807411196 145.426037541,-14.682289811084 145.42936134095,-14.691215095104 145.43537368676,-14.69870971181 145.44348604813,-14.704040214698 145.45290433061,-14.706684988723 145.46270660708,-14.706385243934 145.47193336243,-14.703170309767&rft.coverage=Lizard Island National Park, Queensland, Australia&rft_rights=CC BY-NC http://www.ausgoal.gov.au/creative-commons&rft_rights=CC BY-NC: Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 AU http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/au&rft_subject=Sex Change&rft_subject=Demography&rft_subject=Coral Reef Fishes&rft_subject=Behavioural Ecology&rft_subject=Behavioural Ecology&rft_subject=Biological Sciences&rft_subject=Ecology&rft_subject=Marine and Estuarine Ecology (Incl. Marine Ichthyology)&rft_subject=Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity&rft_subject=Environment&rft_subject=Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Provider

Licence & Rights:

Non-Commercial Licence view details

Access:

Open view details

Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.

Contact Information

DB28-222 office, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

mark.mccormick@jcu.edu.au


Full description

This file contains data sets for the accompanying paper on social queuing in Pomacentrus amboinensis:

Abstract [Related Publication]: Membership of the group is a balance between the benefits associated with group living and the cost of socially constrained growth and breeding opportunities, but the costs and benefits are seldom examined. The goal of the present study was to explore the trade-offs associated with group living for a sex-changing, potentially protogynous coral reef fish, the Ambon damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis. Extensive sampling showed that the species exhibits resource defence polygyny, where dominant males guard a nest site that is visited by females. P. amboinensis have a longevity of about 6.5 years on the northern Great Barrier Reef. While the species can change sex consistent with being a protogynous hermaphrodite, it is unclear the extent to which the species uses this capability. Social groups are comprised of one reproductive male, 1-7 females and a number of juveniles. Females live in a linear dominance hierarchy, with the male being more aggressive to the beta-female than the alpha-female, who exhibits lower levels of ovarian cortisol. Surveys and a tagging study indicated that groups were stable for at least three months. A passive integrated transponder tag study showed that males spawn with females from their own group, but also females from neighbouring groups. In situ behavioural observations found that alpha-females have priority of access to the nest site that the male guarded, and access to higher quality foraging areas. Male removal studies suggest that the alpha-females can change sex to take over from the male when the position becomes available, Examination of otolith microstructure showed that those individuals which change sex to males have different embryonic characteristics at hatching, suggesting that success may involve a component that is endowed. The parently endowed. The relative importance of parental effects and social organisation in affecting the importance of female queuing is yet to be studied, but will likely depend on the strength of social control by the dominant members of the group.

The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.

Data sheets include:

  • Age and size by sex
  • Distance to nest
  • Distance from reef with rank
  • Relative female sixe vs rank
  • Morphology and gender

 

Notes

This dataset is available as a spreadsheet in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document formats (.ods)

Created: 08 07 2015

Data time period: 31 12 1992 to 31 12 2012

145.47193336243,-14.703170309767 145.47968141756,-14.697354768539 145.48519233885,-14.689507707036 145.48792667893,-14.680397078758 145.48761678153,-14.670914596827 145.48429298158,-14.661988484512 145.47828063576,-14.65449260964 145.47016827439,-14.649160899293 145.46074999192,-14.646515429723 145.45094771544,-14.646815256555 145.44172096009,-14.650031019017 145.43397290496,-14.65584781841 145.42846198367,-14.663696087373 145.4257276436,-14.672807411196 145.426037541,-14.682289811084 145.42936134095,-14.691215095104 145.43537368676,-14.69870971181 145.44348604813,-14.704040214698 145.45290433061,-14.706684988723 145.46270660708,-14.706385243934 145.47193336243,-14.703170309767

145.45682716126,-14.676600209223

text: Lizard Island National Park, Queensland, Australia

Identifiers