Dataset
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://www.access.prov.vic.gov.au/public/component/daPublicBaseContainer?component=daViewSeries&breadcrumbPath=Home/Access%20the%20Collection/Browse%20The%20Collection/Series%20Details&entityId=3204&rft.title=Special Improvements Rate Books&rft.identifier=VPRS 3204&rft.publisher=Public Record Office Victoria&rft.description=Every year each local council is required to make and levy rates in respect of all rateable properties within its municipal district. The Municipal Institutions Act 1854 (No.26) empowered local councils to make by-laws for the regulation of their own proceedings including the collection of rates. The amount of rate is therefore determined by the council although a statutory limit applies. Rates are the main source of revenue for the council.The rate record is a record of the levying and payment of rates on rateable properties. Apart from the general rate which is levied equally on all properties, a council may levy an extra rate or a special rate. An extra rate may be levied, over and above the general rate, on a subdivision of a municipality to cover expenses occurred in that subdivision. A special rate may be levied when a council undertakes works for the special benefit of a particular portion of the municipality. Separate rate records are maintained for general, extra and special rates and these are therefore registered as separate series.For each rateable property a record is created which identifies the property and person rated and includes details of the annual value of the property, the amounts due, amounts paid, arrears and when rates were abandoned. A complete rate record may comprise two parts: a Register of Rateable Properties and a Rates Register. The Register of Rateable Properties identifies the properties and persons rated and the Rates Register comprises the accounting details. Where these two parts exist they are registered separately.The format of rate records has changed over the years. Initially the levying and payment of rates were recorded in volumes (known as Rate Books) until the introduction of cards (known as Rate Cards) from the 1930s. In the 1980's and 1990's automated systems have mostly been used. Printouts of the automated system are usually produced as the rate record. Series of rate records in different formats are registered separately.&rft.creator=Darebin II (City 1994-ct)&rft.date=1898&rft.coverage=141.000000,-34.000000 142.919336,-34.145604 144.582129,-35.659230 147.742627,-35.873175 150.024219,-37.529041 150.200000,-39.200000 141.000000,-39.200000 141.000000,-34.000000 141.000000,-34.000000&rft_rights=Records held by Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) are covered by copyright. For information on reusing material from the collection see PROVguide 25 http://prov.vic.gov.au/provguide-25&rft_subject=Historical Studies&rft_subject=History and Archaeology&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Records held by Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) are covered by copyright. For information on reusing material from the collection see PROVguide 25
http://prov.vic.gov.au/provguide-25

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Contact Information

Victorian Archives Centre
99 Shiel St North Melbourne VIC 3051, Australia
Ph: +61 3 9348 5600



Full description

Every year each local council is required to make and levy rates in respect of all rateable properties within its municipal district. The Municipal Institutions Act 1854 (No.26) empowered local councils to make by-laws for the regulation of their own proceedings including the collection of rates. The amount of rate is therefore determined by the council although a statutory limit applies. Rates are the main source of revenue for the council.

The rate record is a record of the levying and payment of rates on rateable properties. Apart from the general rate which is levied equally on all properties, a council may levy an extra rate or a special rate. An extra rate may be levied, over and above the general rate, on a subdivision of a municipality to cover expenses occurred in that subdivision. A special rate may be levied when a council undertakes works for the special benefit of a particular portion of the municipality. Separate rate records are maintained for general, extra and special rates and these are therefore registered as separate series.

For each rateable property a record is created which identifies the property and person rated and includes details of the annual value of the property, the amounts due, amounts paid, arrears and when rates were abandoned. A complete rate record may comprise two parts: a Register of Rateable Properties and a Rates Register. The Register of Rateable Properties identifies the properties and persons rated and the Rates Register comprises the accounting details. Where these two parts exist they are registered separately.

The format of rate records has changed over the years. Initially the levying and payment of rates were recorded in volumes (known as Rate Books) until the introduction of cards (known as Rate Cards) from the 1930s. In the 1980's and 1990's automated systems have mostly been used. Printouts of the automated system are usually produced as the rate record. Series of rate records in different formats are registered separately.

Created: 1898 to 1921

Data time period: 1898 to 1921

Data time period: Series date range : 1898 - 1921
Series in custody date range : 1898 - 1921
Contents in custody date range : 1898 - 1921

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141.000000,-34.000000 142.919336,-34.145604 144.582129,-35.659230 147.742627,-35.873175 150.024219,-37.529041 150.200000,-39.200000 141.000000,-39.200000 141.000000,-34.000000 141.000000,-34.000000

145.6,-36.6

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Identifiers
  • Local : VPRS 3204