Dataset

Timescale Bookmark

Geoscience Australia
Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia) ( Contributor )
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/78519&rft.title=Timescale Bookmark&rft.identifier=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/78519&rft.publisher=Geoscience Australia&rft.description=A simple geological timescale suitable for printing at A4 size; the one-page version has both sides of the bookmark together. The geological timescale is one of the major achievements of geoscience over the last two centuries. The timescale subdivides the 4.6 billion years since the planet formed into a series of time units (e.g. Jurassic). Rocks and particularly the fossils within them have been compared across the world to work out their age relative to each other. This information has been calibrated against an absolute ages of rocks are usually calculated by measuring the natural radioactive decay of minerals. The international standard timescale allows geoscientists to determine the ages of events in Earth history and so understand the evolution of the planet from its formation to the present day.Created for the Geoscience Australia Education Centre&rft.creator=Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia) &rft.date=2013&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=Geoscientific Information &rft_subject=Educational Product&rft_subject=Earth Sciences&rft_subject=Published_External&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Open Licence view details
CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Brief description

A simple geological timescale suitable for printing at A4 size; the one-page version has both sides of the bookmark together. The geological timescale is one of the major achievements of geoscience over the last two centuries. The timescale subdivides the 4.6 billion years since the planet formed into a series of time units (e.g. Jurassic). Rocks and particularly the fossils within them have been compared across the world to work out their age relative to each other. This information has been calibrated against an absolute ages of rocks are usually calculated by measuring the natural radioactive decay of minerals. The international standard timescale allows geoscientists to determine the ages of events in Earth history and so understand the evolution of the planet from its formation to the present day.

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Created for the Geoscience Australia Education Centre

Issued: 2013

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